RESEARCH

MARI 2.0

This study explores the neighborhood activity space and HIV risk among Black men who have sex with men (MSM) in the Deep South. Participants are assigned to a novel two-week global positioning system (GPS) protocol and schedule an initial baseline enrollment clinic visit. During this visit, participants will complete various questionnaires and a pre-GPS feasibility survey using audio computer-assisted-self interview (ACASI) technology. Participants will be scheduled a mid-point clinic visit (7 days after the baseline clinic visit) wherein study staff will download the location data and participants will complete a brief study and a mid-point GPS feasibility survey. During the completion clinic visit (scheduled two weeks after the baseline enrollment clinic visit), participants will return the GPS device and final surveys and a post-GPS feasibility survey using ACASI technology.
Project Coordinator:
Obie McNair, MPH
omcnair@mbk-inc.org
Project Evaluator:
Daniel Chavez-Yenter, MPH
dchavez-yenter@mbk-inc.org

HIV Cure

The overall objective of this study is to quantify empirically the multi-level perceptions of HIV cure clinical research among HIV-infected African-American MSM and affected communities (HIV-negative African-American MSM and community residents) and to identify the salient correlates of knowledge and awareness of HIV cure research, and barriers and facilitators to participation in HIV cure clinical studies. Since perceptions and behaviors may differ by geographic location and population demographics, comprehensively understanding HIV cure perceptions within these contexts is an important component in expanding the knowledge base in HIV cure clinical research and translating evidence-based discoveries into practice. The expected outcomes of this project are new knowledge that will contribute to the field by empirically demonstrating a nuanced understanding of the (1) HIV cure perceptions that will yield new strategies to engage African-American MSM in HIV cure research and (2) multi-level factors associated with HIV cure perceptions, including willingness, barriers, and facilitators to participate in HIV cure clinical research studies. During a 12-month period, we will enroll 225 African-American MSM and 20 co-located community residents from the Atlanta, GA, Jackson, MS, and New Orleans, LA, metropolitan statistical areas.
Project Coordinator:
Obie McNair, MPH
omcnair@mbk-inc.org
Project Evaluator:
Daniel Chavez-Yenter, MPH
dchavez-yenter@mbk-inc.org

GPS 2.0

This study aims to determine the feasibility of obtaining spatial behavior data via GPS devices over a two-week period from a sample of 150 Black men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jackson, MS. The study also aims to characterize the relationship between neighborhood-level with substance use and sexual risk behaviors using activity spaces defined by GPS devices among the sample of 150 Black MSM in Jackson. All participants complete a second two-week protocol three months later, except participants will be assigned to one of three arms that involve reminders for return appointments, to carry the GPS device, and to charge the GPS device. Furthermore, surveys are required for two enrollment appointments at the start of the project and at month 3, as well as two completion appointments at the start of the project and at month 3.
Project Coordinator:
Cordarian Draper
cdraper@mbk-inc.org
Project Evaluator:
Daniel Chavez-Yenter, MPH
dchavez-yenter@mbk-inc.org

GPS 1.0

The goals of this study are to determine the feasibility of obtaining GPS data to define activity space neighborhoods and examine the associations between neighborhood-level factors, drug use and HIV risk behaviors among young Black MSM in the Jackson, MS metropolitan statistical area (MSA). Another goal is to utilize real-time geospatial methods to investigate the relationships between GPS-defined activity space neighborhoods with drug use and sexual risk behaviors among Black MSM in the Jackson, MS MSA. One specific aim is to examine the feasibility (as measured by a pre- and post-survey as well as objectively measured adherence to the GPS protocol) of obtaining GPS spatial behavior data to define activity space neighborhoods in a sample of 100 Black MSM residing in Jackson, MS; Hattiesburg, MS; Gulfport, MS; and New Orleans, LA. Another specific aim is to examine associations between neighborhood-level factors (such as neighborhood poverty, LGBT neighborhood friendliness, access to sexual health services based on one’s activity space), drug use and HIV risk behaviors (e.g., condomless anal sexual behavior, having multiple and concurrent sexual partners) in a sample of 100 Black MSM residing in Jackson, MS; Hattiesburg, MS; Gulfport, MS; and New Orleans, LA. Emerging research shows that MSM experience multiple neighborhoods when, for example, finding sexual partners, drugs and alcohol as well as frequenting venues where drugs and condomless sex is the norm. Finally, virtually no studies have been conducted on neighborhood determinants of drug use and HIV risk among Black MSM specifically and the majority of the neighborhood health research has been conducted among MSM populations in urban areas such as New York City and San Francisco.
Project Coordinator:
Cordarian Draper
cdraper@mbk-inc.org

SHIPP Study

The Sustainable Healthcenter Implementation PrEP Pilot (SHIPP) is a research study funded by the CDC and Gilead Sciences for people who take the pill Truvada daily to reduce their risk of HIV infection. We want to learn more about how PrEP is used so we can better help others on or considering PrEP. This study has three parts:

  • Part one involves completing an interview every 6 months to help us understand knowledge and attitudes about healthcare and medications and how they may stay the same or change while on PrEP. The interview takes roughly 45 minutes. Because this means extra time in the clinic, participants are compensated $25.
  • Part two involves taking a few drops of blood to monitor the amount of Truvada in participants blood.
  • Part three involves collecting a small amount of blood only if a participant becomes HIV infected while taking Truvada. The blood is then sent to the lab to see if the virus is sensitive to the medication.
  • Project Coordinators:
    Isa Wrenn-Jones
    imwrennjones@mbk-inc.org
    Joshua Agee
    jagee@mbk-inc.org

Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: